Cromhall South Gloucestershire

For once before this, Albert George or Bert was named Perrett. A man who died on the 8th June 1916 serving as a sapper in the 70th Field Company, Royal Engineers. The son of John and Emma Perrett of Cromhall. Buried at Bethune Town Cemetery in northern France. At Duty’s Call – they wrote on his gravestone.


Laid to the side of an English churchyard, a slice of social history erodes to the dust that it once was. A family memorial to a son who once was.


Albert george Perrett


For this is Cromhall in South Gloucestershire. And the slice is literally that, the fallen frontis of the family gravestone. Only part now survives. A part story that needed to be pieced together.

Albert George ‘Bert’ Son of the above Who fell in action at Bethune 1916 Aged 29 years A man who laid down his life for his friends

For once before, Albert George or Bert was named Perrett. A man who died on the 8th June 1916 serving as a sapper in the 70th Field Company, Royal Engineers. The son of John and Emma Perrett of Cromhall. Buried at Bethune Town Cemetery in northern France. At Duty’s Call – they wrote on his gravestone.



But Bert Perrett was of singular importance to one family, his own. His death would have rippled across Cromhall society, with a family connection to the Royal Oak pub in Cromhall. His cause of death too painful to consider: both of his legs shot away to die from blood loss at No 33 Casualty Clearing Station at Bethune.


A glazier, painter and plumber before the war, he joined up on its outbreak. For over a year, he had been on or near the frontline.


A family affair; with three other brothers in the army and navy. But his is the only Perrett on the war memorial at Cromhall:


In memory of the men from this parish who died for their country in the Great War 1914 – 1919

There are two other men buried here who are official war dead – both died in 1918, both suffering from phthisis – pulmonary tuberculosis. Edgar Dyer and George Harold Hall.