Wars Last Goodbyes
Individual Record

inscription

And

Frederick

Dennis

Phipps

Killed in Action

At Salerno

23rd Sept 1943

Aged 33 years

Rest in peace

place of inscription

Stratford upon Avon Cemetery

Warwickshire

who does this memorial relate to?

Forename:

Surname:

Date of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Date of Death:

Place of Death:

Age at death:

Burial place:

Commemoration:

War:

Rank:

Regiment/Unit/Squadron:

Company/
Squadron/Unit:

Other Regiment/Unit/Squadron served:

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Additional Comments:

Frederick Dennis

Phipps

29th April 1910

Stratford upon Avon, Warwickshire

23rd September 1943

Killed in action at Pontecagnano near Salerno in the advance out from the bay as part of the invasion of Italy

33

Salerno War Cemetery, Italy

Second World War

Private

9th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

16th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

He was killed serving with the 16th Durham Light Infantry but was from the 9th DLI. It seems likely that Fred found himself caught up in the events that led to a so-called mutiny involving the 50th and 51st Divisions which included the 9th DLI on the 16th September 1943. A group of men convalescing in North Africa after having fought for the British Eighth Army were called to fight in Italy and promised that they would be returned to their original units. They arrived in Italy to find a) that it was not true b) they were left on the beach for three days c) that their call-up had been at best badly explained or at worst a complete mistake - the men refused an order to join their new units - after being read the riot act, some agreed to join their units rather than be charged with mutiny and be shot, but 192 men refused. They were arrested, put in a POW camp and sent back to Algeria to be charged and put on trial. The trial was hurried and unfair - the men were all found guilty, the NCOs given death sentences before one officer saw sense and commuted their sentence to hard labour. These were men who had fought in North Africa, given blood and been given bravery awards. Their military honours were stripped, their pensions reduced and they were ordered to join their units. They were militarily disgraced for nothing more than poor military bureaucracy and comradeship. The unit that the 9th DLI were ordered to join at Salerno was the 16th DLI so it seems likely Fred was one that agreed to fight for this new unit.

Other Records from the same place:

Jones

First World War

William Edward

Jones

Royal Naval Air Service

Phipps

Second World War

Frederick Dennis

Phipps

9th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

Kinman

First World War

William Norman

Kinman

1st/1st Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery

For more records from the same place:

Other Records from the same battalion/unit/squadron:

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